Saturday, 25 October 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm Discusses Potential Concerns Related to Breast Self-Exams

Unfortunately, many women remain in the dark about the importance of regular health checkups with their primary care physician. Pharmacist Marla Ahlgrimm explains why such routine appointments can be especially beneficial for women who wish to alleviate their risk of breast cancer.

Q: As Breast Cancer Awareness Month brings this subject into the national spotlight once again, how is it affecting the conversation between the medical community and the general public?

Marla Ahlgrimm: Breast Cancer Awareness Month is a wonderful time to discuss the many research studies, articles and other related news about breast cancer research and its latest developments. By taking responsibility for their personal health, women are overcoming environmental and hereditary factors that may impact their futures.

Friday, 3 October 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm Explains the Influence of Estrogen on Feminine Moods

Marla Ahlgrimm
When tears flow more easily in women and patience is shorter than usual, blame is often placed on hormones. But just how strong is the influence of hormones on a woman’s emotions? Pharmacist Marla Ahlgrimm explains the true relationship between moods and estrogen, a crucial component of a women’s health.

While estrogen is the hormone typically associated with menstruation and ovulation, it is important to understand the greater scope of its effect on the female body, says Marla Ahlgrimm. In women, estrogen circulates in the bloodstream and binds to estrogen receptors on cells in targeted tissues. This affects not only the breasts and uterus, but also the heart, brain, bone, liver, and other tissues.

Thursday, 21 August 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm Advises Women to Use Exercise for Fighting Menopause Symptoms

Marla Ahlgrimm
Regular physical activity is important for women who may be struggling with menopause, says pharmacist Marla Ahlgrimm. The women’s health expert shares some fitness tips in this Q & A for women who are looking for relief from hot flashes and mood swings.

Q: Why is physical activity such a cornerstone of a woman’s daily routine?

Marla Ahlgrimm: Exercise offers a number of different benefits. It helps to strengthen bones, reduce the onset of osteoporosis and prevent weight gain. Regular physical activity has been shown to improve the quality of life for both men and women.

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm, Pharmacist, Discusses Thyroid Screening for Postmenopausal Women

Marla Ahlgrimm says that many women feel their life is over during menopause. Aches, pains, and feelings of fatigue often leave women reminiscing about the way they felt in their youth. But it doesn’t have to be that way. According to pharmacist, Marla Ahlgrimm, Women’s Health America – a company she founded to serve the specific needs of women – sees patients every day who believe these and other symptoms are a natural part of the aging process. It’s not, she says – not always.

The National Thyroid Institute reports that hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism may be the cause of some women’s PMS and menopause-like symptoms including weight gain, painful joints, and chronic fatigue. There are several tests, Marla Ahlgrimm explains, that can identify whether a woman’s issues are truly a hormone imbalance or a problem with the thyroid gland.

Thursday, 3 July 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm Says Protein Vital for Women

Women fall short where protein intake is concerned but a few easy changes can help.

Protein deficiency

A lack of protein, explains pharmacist Marla Ahlgrimm, can cause a host of unpleasant symptoms including fatigue and muscle loss. Worse still, this type of deficiency may reduce the body’s ability to heal after an injury and may also compromise the immune system.

Easy fixes

According to Marla Ahlgrimm, while many women try to avoid protein-rich foods like red meat, there are many easy ways to compensate for a protein shortage:

Wednesday, 14 May 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm Teaches Women How to Manage PMS Symptoms

As a prominent health expert and pharmacist, Marla Ahlgrimm is happy to share useful tips to women struggling with PMS symptoms.

Q: Are there specific vitamins or minerals that women can take during this time?

Marla Ahlgrimm: Research has shown that women can reduce many of the most difficult symptoms – menstrual cramps, depression, mood swings – by consuming a sufficient amount of calcium and magnesium on a daily basis. Calcium in particular is a vital nutrient for women in the prevention of osteoporosis.

Q: Is exercise a help or a hindrance in this situation?

Marla Ahlgrimm: One of the primary methods for reducing PMS symptoms is through regular physical activity. Exercise is known to reduce stress and decrease a woman’s risk of life-threatening diseases like cancer and heart disease. For today’s women, working out doesn’t have to mean hours of drudgery in the gym. Walking, swimming, yoga, Kick Fit, Tae Bo and tennis are all excellent forms of exercise.

Wednesday, 30 April 2014

Marla Ahlgrimm | Postpartum Depression

Marla Ahlgrimm
A few days of the blues is normal, says women’s health expert Marla Ahlgrimm, but extended feelings of depression may point to a more serious problem.

Q: What is the difference between Postpartum Depression and the Postpartum Blues?

Marla Ahlgrimm: Postpartum depression is a serious concern for new mothers. This is a condition where a woman becomes so distraught that she becomes unable to properly care for her infant. Although fairly rare, it has been estimated that the number of women suffering from PPD is upwards of 40,000 each year. The milder and more common Postpartum Blues is short-lived and rarely interferes with a woman’s new role as caretaker. Typically, women with the blues feel exhausted and may cry occasionally but will begin to enjoy their parental responsibilities within two weeks.

Q: Can Postpartum Depression be prevented?

Marla Ahlgrimm: With proper care and techniques, yes. However, it’s vital for a woman to fully understand her risk factors before becoming pregnant. These include having history of hormone-related or previous postpartum depression, being directly related to a women who has experienced PPD, a prior mood disorder including depression or anxiety. Additional research indicates that a woman who has severe PMS may also be at a higher risk for PDD.

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